Outlook 2013 and Google Apps Sync

Installed Windows 8 and Office 2013 in a virtual machine yesterday – and I’m glad I chose to do it that way: it seems that the Google Apps sync tool isn’t working yet!

Issue One: the standard installer doesn’t work. “Please download and install the 64-bit version of Google Apps Sync”

If you search for the 64-bit installer you’ll find Google’s download page for the MSI file, but the standard link generates this error when trying to set things up. Not so helpful.

Issue Two: Failed to create profile.

After installing the 64-bit MSI and launching the tool manually, we still can’t create a new profile.

Interestingly, the import profile option is greyed out, so something is really not working there.

Hopefully Google addresses this soon, but in the meantime, stay with Office 2010 if you rely on this.

The only other option at this stage seems to be IMAP, which is fine for email but not other Outlook data.

UPDATE 9 June 2013: It’s now officially supported by Google. Tried it out last week and it works a treat on a clean installation.

The only difference to be aware of (that I’ve found) is that the screen that formerly asked for your username and password now only asks for your username, or email address. It then shoots you off in your broswer to Google, asking you to  authorise Outlook in much the same way as a 3rd party Twitter app requests authorisation. Authorise it, close the browser window and continue as previously.

Don’t Let Email Sit in Your Inbox Unpunished

If you’re anything like me, you receive a lot of email. Some days I feel like the only thing I’ve done all day is deal with email! Given the amount of other things that must be done in business, it’s easy to just put it in the “too hard basket” – but that can also be very dangerous.

I read this article on email and customer service about 6 months ago but while I was looking at some goals for 2008 I thought it was worth revisiting. So how do you stack up in those figures? If I’m not careful I tend to find myself amongst the 70% who fail to respond within 24 hours. Definately something I’ll be fixing for 2008. A good tactic is mentioned in Mike’s first point:

Automatically respond to all emails received: People will be more willing to wait for a reply if their initial communication has been acknowledged. Include a commitment to act on the issue and when you will respond fully.

I think people will generally understand if you can’t address the issue immediately – but it’s important to acknowledge the email and set an expectation of when you will be able to do so. It also ties in to something I wrote back in 2004 about controlling your email (instead of the other way around!) – it’s as relevant now as then. So, my top tips:

  1. Choose when to check your email – don’t let your computer decide for you
  2. As you’re going through your messages, fire up your diary (or whatever time management tool you use) and mark a time to actually attend to the task or issue
  3. Respond to each email as soon as you read it (even if it’s only a brief response) – and at that point you can let the other person know when you’ll attend to is as well

Of course, if it’s an emergency you may need to deal with it straight away and all the above advice is null and void, but we don’t live in a perfect world, do we?

Originally posted at almostanything.com.au